7 Classes (84 Units)

6.021[J] (12), 6.004 (12), 6.102 (12), 8.06 (12), 9.33 (12), 21G.321 (12), 21G.403 (12)

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6.021[J] Cellular Biophysics and Neurophysiology

Class Info

Examines the birth and international expansion of an American industry of political marketing with an emphasis on Latin America. Focuses attention on the cultural processes, sociopolitical contexts and moral utopias that shape the practice of political marketing in the US and in different Latin American countries. By looking at the debates and expert practices at the core of the business of politics, explores how the "universal" concept of democracy is interpreted and reworked through space and time. Examines how different cultural groups experimenting with political marketing understand the role of citizens in a democracy.

This class has 18.03, 2.005, 6.002, 6.003, 6.071, 10.301, 20.110, and 20.111 as prerequisites.

6.021[J] will not be offered this semester. It will be instructed by M. Vidart-Delgado.

Lecture occurs 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in 32-144.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits. This class counts as a HASS S. This is a graduate-level class.

You can find more information on MIT OpenCourseWare at the Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs site.

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Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
Tags
versions sussman computational abelson structure and interpretation of computer programs

6.004 Computation Structures

Class Info

Introduces architecture of digital systems, emphasizing structural principles common to a wide range of technologies. Multilevel implementation strategies; definition of new primitives (e.g., gates, instructions, procedures, and processes) and their mechanization using lower-level elements. Analysis of potential concurrency; precedence constraints and performance measures; pipelined and multidimensional systems. Instruction set design issues; architectural support for contemporary software structures.

This class has no prerequisites.

6.004 will not be offered this semester. It will be instructed by C. J. Terman, S. Z. Hanono Wachman and D. Sanchez.

Lecture occurs 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays in 32-123.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+6.004&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site.

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6.102 Introductory RF Design Laboratory

Class Info

Introductory experimental laboratory focuses on the fundamentals of radio frequency design through the study of radio receiver circuits from 1920 to 1960. Five labs using JFETs (arranged to behave like triodes and pentodes) investigate the behavior of series and parallel tuned circuits, bandwidth control, RF amplifiers, local oscillators, mixers, IF amplifiers, AM and FM detectors, audio stages, and RF measurements. Lecture topics include regenerative receivers and detectors; tuned RF, neutrodyne, superheterodyne and FM receivers; the "All-American 5" AC-DC AM receiver; and common vacuum tube triode and pentode topologies. Five weeks of the term are devoted to the restoration and circuit analysis of an antique FM-only radio or tuner and an AM-only radio or tuner, both supplied by the instructor. 12 Engineering Design Points.

This class has 6.002, and 6.071 as prerequisites.

6.102 will not be offered this semester. It will be instructed by B. M. Roscoe.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

In the Spring 2012 Subject Evaluations, 6.102 was rated 5.3 out of 7.0. You can find more information on MIT OpenCourseWare at the Microelectronic Devices and Circuits site.

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Microelectronic Devices and Circuits
Tags
devices circuits microelectronic ocw r. t. prentice hall upper saddle river

8.06 Quantum Physics III

Class Info

Continuation of 8.05. Units: natural units, scales of microscopic phenomena, applications. Time-independent approximation methods: degenerate and nondegenerate perturbation theory, variational method, Born-Oppenheimer approximation, applications to atomic and molecular systems. The structure of one- and two-electron atoms: overview, spin-orbit and relativistic corrections, fine structure, variational approximation, screening, Zeeman and Stark effects. Charged particles in a magnetic field: Landau levels and integer quantum hall effect. Scattering: general principles, partial waves, review of one-dimension, low-energy approximations, resonance, Born approximation. Time-dependent perturbation theory. Students research and write a paper on a topic related to the content of 8.05 and 8.06.

This class has 8.05 as a prerequisite.

8.06 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by B. Zwiebach.

Lecture occurs 9:30 AM to 11:00 AM on Tuesdays and Thursdays in 6-120.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits. This class counts as a CI-M.

You can find more information at the MIT + 8.06 - Google Search site or on the 8.06 Stellar site.

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9.33 Your Brain: A User's Guide

Class Info

Provides students with perspective on brain functions and behaviors of particular relevance to individuals their age. Using library databases, students conduct scholarly research and compare the attitudes conveyed in magazines and newspapers with facts from neurobiology textbooks, scientific reviews, and basic research articles. Each student presents and leads a discussion on a topic related to a behavior of his or her choosing. Preference to freshmen and non-Course 9 majors; limited to 17.

This class has no prerequisites.

9.33 will be offered this semester (Fall 2018). It is instructed by .

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the MIT + 9.33 - Google Search site or on the 9.33 Stellar site.

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21G.321 Childhood and Youth in French and Francophone Cultures

Class Info

Studies the transformation of childhood and youth since the 18th century in France, as well as the development of sentimentality within the family in a francophone context. Examines the personification of children, both as a source of inspiration for artistic creation and a political ideal aimed at protecting future generations. Considers various representations of childhood and youth in literature (e.g., Pagnol, Proust, Sarraute, Laye, Morgiévre), movies (e.g., Truffaut), and songs (e.g., Brel, Barbara). Taught in French.

This class has no prerequisites.

21G.321 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by B. Perreau.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits. This class counts as a HASS H.

You can find more information at the MIT + 21G.321 - Google Search site or on the 21G.321 Stellar site.

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21G.403 German III

Class Info

Expands skills in speaking, reading, listening, and writing. Develops analytic and interpretative skills through the reading of a full-length drama as well as short prose and poetry (Dürrenmatt, Boll, Borchert, and others) and through media selections on contemporary issues in German-speaking cultures. Discussions and compositions based on these texts. Review of grammar and development of vocabulary-building strategies. Recommended for students with two years of high school German. Limited to 18 per section.

This class has 21G.402 as a prerequisite.

21G.403 will be offered this semester (Fall 2018). It is instructed by E. Crocker.

Lecture occurs 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays in 16-676.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits. This class counts as a HASS H.

You can find more information at the MIT + 21G.403 - Google Search site or on the 21G.403 Stellar site.

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