3.985 and 7.05 have conflicting lecture times!

6 Classes (63 Units)

3.985 (9), 7.03 (12), 7.05 (12), 10.01 (6), 10.02 (12), 24.06 (12)

Pre-Register


3.985 Archaeological Science

Class Info

Pressing issues in archaeology as an anthropological science. Stresses the natural science and engineering methods archaeologists use to address these issues. Reconstructing time, space, and human ecologies provides one focus; materials technologies that transform natural materials to material culture provide another. Topics include 14C dating, ice core and palynological analysis, GIS and other remote sensing techniques for site location, soil micromorphology and site formation, sourcing of metal artifacts, and microstructural and mechanical analyses of cementitious materials used in ancient monumental buildings.

This class has 3.091, 5.111, and 8.01 as prerequisites.

3.985 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by H. N. Lechtman.

Lecture occurs 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM on Mondays in 4-370.

This class counts for a total of 9 credits. This class counts as a HASS S.

You can find more information at the MIT + 3.985 - Google Search site or on the 3.985 Stellar site.

MIT 3.985 Archaeological Science Related Textbooks
MIT 3.985 Archaeological Science On The Web

7.03 Genetics

Class Info

The principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. Structure and function of genes, chromosomes, and genomes. Biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection. Population genetics. Use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation, and inherited disease.

This class has 7.01x as a prerequisite.

7.03 will be offered this semester (Fall 2017). It is instructed by P. Gupta and P. Reddien.

Lecture occurs 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in 4-370.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the MIT + 7.03 - Google Search site or on the 7.03 Stellar site.

Required Textbooks
Save up to up to 44% by purchasing through MIT Textbooks!
MIT 7.03 Genetics Related Textbooks
MIT 7.03 Genetics On The Web

7.05 General Biochemistry

Class Info

Contributions of biochemistry toward an understanding of the structure and functioning of organisms, tissues, and cells. Chemistry and functions of constituents of cells and tissues and the chemical and physical-chemical basis for the structures of nucleic acids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Basic enzymology and biochemical reaction mechanisms involved in macromolecular synthesis and degradation, signaling, transport, and movement. General metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and nitrogen-containing materials such as amino acids, proteins, and related compounds.

This class has 5.12, and 7.01x as prerequisites.

7.05 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by M. Vander Heiden and M. Yaffe.

Lecture occurs 9:30 AM to 11:00 AM on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in 10-250.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the MIT + 7.05 - Google Search site or on the 7.05 Stellar site.

Required Textbooks
Save up to up to 44% by purchasing through MIT Textbooks!
MIT 7.05 General Biochemistry Related Textbooks
MIT 7.05 General Biochemistry On The Web

10.01 Ethics for Engineers

Class Info

Integrates classical readings that provide an overview of ethics with a survey of case studies that focus on ethical problems arising in the practice of engineering. Readings taken from a variety of sources, such as Aristotle, Machiavelli, Bacon, Hobbes, Locke, the Founding Fathers, and the Bible. Case studies include written analyses and films that address engineering disasters, biotechnology, court cases, ethical codes, and the ultimate scope and aims of engineering. Students taking independent inquiry version 6.9041 expand the scope of their term project.

This class has no prerequisites.

10.01 will be offered this semester (Fall 2017). It is instructed by D. Doneson and B. L. Trout.

Lecture occurs 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM on Wednesdays in 66-154.

This class counts for a total of 6 credits.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+10.01&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site or on the 10.01 Stellar site.

MIT 10.01 Ethics for Engineers Related Textbooks

10.02 Foundations of Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Class Info

Studies economic and leadership foundations of entrepreneurship as they relate to engineering. Case studies illustrate major impacts of engineering on the world and examine the leaders responsible for such impacts. Authors include Franklin, Keynes, Leonardo, Lincoln, Locke, Machiavelli, Marx, Schmidt, Schumpeter, Smith, Thiel, and Tocqueville. Discusses topics such as the difference between an entrepreneur and a manager, the entrepreneur as founder, and characteristics of principled entrepreneurship.

This class has no prerequisites.

10.02 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by D. Doneson and B. L. Trout.

Lecture occurs 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM on Mondays in 56-169.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+10.02&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site or on the 10.02 Stellar site.

Required Textbooks
Save up to a ton by purchasing through MIT Textbooks!
MIT 10.02 Foundations of Entrepreneurship for Engineers Related Textbooks
MIT 10.02 Foundations of Entrepreneurship for Engineers On The Web

24.06 Bioethics

Class Info

Considers ethical questions that have arisen from the growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. Should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? If so, when and how? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What types of living things are appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? Draws on philosophy, history, and anthropology to show how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives.

This class has no prerequisites.

24.06 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by R. Scheffler and A. Prescott-Couch.

Lecture occurs 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM on Tuesdays and Thursdays in 32-141.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits. This class counts as a HASS H. This class counts as a CI-H.

You can find more information at the MIT + 24.06 - Google Search site.

MIT 24.06 Bioethics Related Textbooks
MIT 24.06 Bioethics On The Web

© Copyright 2015