6.858 and 21W.764 have conflicting lecture times!
6.858 and 18.03 have conflicting lecture times!

7 Classes (78 Units)

6.035 (12), 6.037 (6), 6.824 (12), 6.858 (12), 18.03 (12), 18.065 (12), 21W.764 (12)

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6.035 Computer Language Engineering

Class Info

Analyzes issues associated with the implementation of higher-level programming languages. Fundamental concepts, functions, and structures of compilers. The interaction of theory and practice. Using tools in building software. Includes a multi-person project on compiler design and implementation.

This class has 6.004, and 6.031 as prerequisites.

6.035 will be offered this semester (Fall 2017). It is instructed by M. J. Carbin and M. C. Rinard.

Lecture occurs 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in 3-370.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+6.035&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site.

MIT 6.035 Computer Language Engineering Related Textbooks

6.037 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Class Info

Studies the structure and interpretation of computer programs which transcend specific programming languages. Demonstrates thought patterns for computer science using Scheme. Includes weekly programming projects. Enrollment may be limited.

This class has no prerequisites.

6.037 will not be offered this semester. It will be available during IAP.

This class counts for a total of 6 credits.

You can find more information at the MIT + 6.037 - Google Search site.

MIT 6.037 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Related Textbooks
MIT 6.037 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs On The Web

6.824 Distributed Computer Systems Engineering

Class Info

Abstractions and implementation techniques for engineering distributed systems: remote procedure call, threads and locking, client/server, peer-to-peer, consistency, fault tolerance, and security. Readings from current literature. Individual laboratory assignments culminate in the construction of a fault-tolerant and scalable network file system. Programming experience with C/C++ required. Enrollment limited.

This class has 6.033 as a prerequisite.

6.824 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by M. F. Kaashoek and R. T. Morris.

Lecture occurs 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays in 54-100.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+6.824&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site.

MIT 6.824 Distributed Computer Systems Engineering Related Textbooks
MIT 6.824 Distributed Computer Systems Engineering On The Web

6.858 Computer Systems Security

Class Info

Design and implementation of secure computer systems. Lectures cover attacks that compromise security as well as techniques for achieving security, based on recent research papers. Topics include operating system security, privilege separation, capabilities, language-based security, cryptographic network protocols, trusted hardware, and security in web applications and mobile phones. Labs involve implementing and compromising a web application that sandboxes arbitrary code, and a group final project.

This class has 6.033, 6.005, and 6.031 as prerequisites.

6.858 will be offered this semester (Fall 2017). It is instructed by N. B. Zeldovich.

Lecture occurs 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM on Mondays and Wednesdays in E25-111.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+6.858&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site.

MIT 6.858 Computer Systems Security Related Textbooks

18.03 Differential Equations

Class Info

Study of differential equations, including modeling physical systems. Solution of first-order ODEs by analytical, graphical, and numerical methods. Linear ODEs with constant coefficients. Complex numbers and exponentials. Inhomogeneous equations: polynomial, sinusoidal, and exponential inputs. Oscillations, damping, resonance. Fourier series. Matrices, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization. First order linear systems: normal modes, matrix exponentials, variation of parameters. Heat equation, wave equation. Nonlinear autonomous systems: critical point analysis, phase plane diagrams.

This class has 18.02 as a corequisite.

18.03 will be offered this semester (Fall 2017). It is instructed by A. Negut.

Lecture occurs 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in 54-100.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+18.03&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site or on the 18.03 Stellar site.

MIT 18.03 Differential Equations Related Textbooks

18.065 Matrix Methods in Data Analysis, Signal Processing, and Machine Learning

Class Info

Reviews linear algebra with applications to life sciences, finance, and big data. Covers singular value decomposition, weighted least squares, signal and image processing, principal component analysis, covariance and correlation matrices, directed and undirected graphs, matrix factorizations, neural nets, machine learning, and hidden Markov models.

This class has 18.06 as a prerequisite.

18.065 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by G. Strang.

Lecture occurs 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM on Tuesdays and Thursdays in 2-190.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+18.065&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site or on the 18.065 Stellar site.

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21W.764 The Word Made Digital

Class Info

Video games, digital art and literature, online texts, and source code are analyzed in the contexts of history, culture, and computing platforms. Approaches from poetics and computer science are used to understand the non-narrative digital uses of text. Students undertake critical writing and creative computer projects to encounter digital writing through practice. This involves reading and modifying computer programs; therefore previous programming experience, although not required, will be helpful. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 18.

This class has no prerequisites.

21W.764 will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by N. Montfort.

Lecture occurs 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM on Wednesdays in 14E-310.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits. This class counts as a HASS A.

You can find more information at the http://www.google.com/search?&q=MIT+%2B+21W.764&btnG=Google+Search&inurl=https site.

MIT 21W.764 The Word Made Digital Related Textbooks

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