11.238J Ethics of Intervention


Class Info

An historical and cross-cultural study of the logics and practices of intervention: the ways that individuals, institutions, and governments identify conditions of need or states of emergency within and across borders that require a response. Examines when a response is viewed as obligatory, when is it deemed unnecessary, and by whom; when the intercession is considered fulfilled; and the rationales or assumptions that are employed in assessing interventions. Theories of the state, globalization, and humanitarianism; power, policy, and institutions; gender, race, and ethnicity; and law, ethics, and morality are examined.

This class has no prerequisites.

11.238J will not be offered this semester. It will be available in the Spring semester, and will be instructed by E. C. James.

This class counts for a total of 12 credits. This is a graduate-level class.

You can find more information at the Ethics of Intervention: Anthropological Approaches site.

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